Charlie Calder-Potts - Limited Edition Ukulele Print

Charlie Calder-Potts - Limited Edition Ukulele Print

Regular price £100.00 Sale

'No End for the Clouds'

Medium: Pencil, gold leaf and ink

Ukulele: Kala Concert

Archival Inkjet Print

Somerset Satin 330gsm paper

A3 Print

Edition run of 50

First Five Signed and numbered by the artist

Subsequent editions come with a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist

 

Artist Statement: 'Travel and the insight and understanding it provides into different cultures and people is essential to my practice. The Middle East and the ancient interactions encouraged by the silk route between the East and West are of particular interest. My work looks at people; our similarities in spite of differing environments, religions and cultural practices and the cyclical nature of history demonstrated throughout.

My paintings attempt to condense the history of a place within a contemporary format. The photography element to my work provides a documentary quality that is in many ways a form of reportage; recording an anonymous individual going about their everyday life whether that be commuting on the overground in Hackney or on the streets of Erbil in Iraq. The mixed imagery I layer over this then brings many elements of history to that place and person. It is a way of observing; revealing forgotten elements of the past alongside an unseen/unnoticed present.

Thousands of years of trade have meant that philosophy, religion and language have been in a constant state of flux. One thing however remains the same - we are all human and have human nature in common; inquisitive, curious, spiritual beings that constantly question morality and our existence through the use of arts.

I work with a variety of media such as photography, inks, oils, waxes, pastels on various supports such as aluminium, scrap armoured metal, copper, wood panel and more recently vellum paper. My pieces vary in size - with anything from 10cm x 15cm works on paper to 8ft x 10ft aluminium installations.

The title of this piece is the translation of the Farsi script on the ukulele.'