Lot 170 - Kavel Rafferty - Poppy
Lot 170 - Kavel Rafferty - Poppy

Lot 170 - Kavel Rafferty - Poppy

Ink Collage on Paper
2021
A6 (10x15cm) original artwork
Signed on verso
ARTIST INFO

I was raised by hippy parents. My dad named me Kavel; more than likely he picked the name up whilst travelling in India. Kavel is actually a Hindi boy’s name meaning lotus flower, which is lovely – thank you for that, Dad! We moved and travelled a lot as a family and I'm sure this lifestyle has encouraged my love of adventure. I have lived all over; a couple of years in Sweden and almost a decade in Barcelona. I feel I have (finally?) settled, in the vibrant sea-side town of Margate. I came out as a lesbian quite late in life, at the age of 43. This has been so liberating for me; it has definitely been a catalyst for stronger and more confident work. I’m happy and comfortable in myself now, as an out queer woman.

About the postcard artworks

Queer flower In my most recent work I explore the artistic tropes of the floral still life and flowers to examine ideas of remembrance, femininity and queerness in it's modern sense as well as it's original meaning of something strange and or peculiar. I’m looking to reclaiming flowers from their somewhat domestic life, after all, historically (until relatively recently) female artists were not permitted to paint much else. I am decontextualizing and subverting photographic flowers by redacting with paint and collage. Sometimes blocking out the detail and delicacy completely with ink brush marks, making shadows and silhouettes; an absence of light. These images can be ethereal or much darker with a gothic undercurrent, others are given a sense of joy with bright yellows and fleshy pinks. Some are trippy bodies paired with psychedelic hybrids, club lights and late nights. Other reminiscent of double exposed photos or the end of a roll of film, women in summer meadows... naked, half hidden, intertwined with painted camouflage. Some become large ice sculptures or frosted ornaments, pink fluffy clouds on table tops, dark gushing fountains or sinister squawking crows. Flowers for the dead and for the still living. Some are the darkest bouquet ever received, others glow and feel like they might continue to grow. I am continually pushing for more ways to corrupt the flowers, their meaning as well as their charms.